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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 31, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11: president trump fires the acting us attorney general after she refuses to enforce his immigration ban. a former senior civil servant says theresa may has put the queen in a ‘very difficult‘ position by offering him a state visit so soon. since a date has not been set for the state visit it could perhaps be put off a little bit until things have calmed down. mps will debate the government's bill to trigger the formal process of leaving the european union. a french—canadian student appears in court in quebec, charged with the murders of six muslim worshippers — shot dead at a mosque on sunday. also... calling time on time travel. we need to get back. back where? to the future... peter ca paldi shocks fans by announcing he's stepping down from playing doctor who.
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and it's transfer deadline day in england as premier league spending nears a january record. good morning. it's tuesday january the 31st. welcome to bbc newsroom live. donald trump has sacked the united states' top legal advisor after she questioned the legality of his travel ban. sally yates, who was acting attorney general, said she couldn't defend his decision to temporarily stop refugees and citizens of seven mainly—muslim countries from entering america. but the white house said in a statement that she had "betrayed" the department
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ofjustice. in the uk a former head of the horror —— foreign office has criticised theresa may's state invitation to the president. he said the offer had been premature and put the offer had been premature and put the queen in a very difficult situation. protests have been held in cities across the uk as of last night including in cardiff, seen here. an online petition calling for the state visit to be cancelled has gathered more than 1.6 million signatures. his david willets. —— here is a david willets. donald trump's controversial travel ban is facing resistance on a variety of fronts. after a weekend of mass protests, chaos at airports and a diplomatic outcry came an unusual act of defiance on the part of america's top law officer. sally yates, appointed us attorney general by barack obama, said in a letter to lawyers at the justice department that
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given her responsibility to ensure that the government stands for what is right... deeming that an act of betrayal, mr trump promptly sacked her, installing dana boente as the new attorney general. pending the swearing in of mr trump's preferred candidate, alabama senator jeff sessions, whose confirmation has been delayed by democrats in congress. sally yates is not alone in her misgivings, though. barack obama said in a statement that he fundamentally disagreed with the notion of discriminating against individuals on the basis of faith or religion. us diplomats have also registered their concerns, leading to this tongue lashing from the white house. if these career bureaucrats have a problem with it, i think that they should either get with the programme, or they can go. later today, mr trump is due
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to announce his pick for a place on the us supreme court. the choice, he said, was one that would appeal to evangelical christians. he may also be hoping it leads to some better headlines. here, the former head of the foreign office, lord ricketts said theresa may's decision to invite donald trump on a state visit to the uk so quickly has put the queen in a "very difficult position". a state visit is the highest accolade the country can pay to a foreign leader. and normally it is offered after a us president has been in office for several years. and to issue the invitation in the first days of president trump's being in the white house, to happen in the next few months, felt to me when i heard it a bit premature, frankly. i didn't think it was necessary. i think it would've been fine to have suggested he come on an official visit for talks with the prime minister,
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perhaps tea the queen and save this absolute honour of the state visit for later. my suggestion, and it is only a suggestion, is perhaps since a date has not yet been set for the state visit that it could be put off a little bit perhaps until things calmed down and we can receive the president on a state visit in the way we would want to with the celebration of the relationship with the us and in the meantime he should come on early official visit to discuss all the vital things we need to be talking about like a new free trade agreement, for example. but put a state visit off till a bit later. i wouldn't suggest we withdraw the invitation but since a date has not been fixed i think we can look again at the timing. with me is our diplomatic correspondent james landale. .. he knows the ins and outs of diplomacy and has enormous experience. what about that idea of for now unofficial visit and a state
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visit at a later stage? would that bea visit at a later stage? would that be a runner? technically possible. politically very damaging. the prime minister made it clear yesterday the visit was going ahead and said it was an informal invitation which is an interesting use of language. it implies a bit of flexibility. but a state visit has been offered and accepted on a political level. the official invitation has yet to go in but that happens sometime later. i think the consequences of doing so make it very unlikely simply because to do so would damage the special relationship because the americans would naturally be unhappy. i think we would be less likely to have warm relations and an early trade deal if this is downgraded. especially when all the signals from the white house, the bullying of these state occasions is wanted and what has been ordered up on this occasion. —— the glamour of these state occasions. there is a question of
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timing. the precise date has not been nailed down. that might slip somewhere into the autumn to take somewhere into the autumn to take some of the heat out of this particular controversy. it feels like a lot of finger—pointing is going on about who made the actual decision for the invitation to be put out there. looking at previous presidents how has it happened? not all previous presidents have had a state visit. what consideration goes into it and who makes the final call? it is quite rare for a us president to get a state visit. only two have had them in the reign of the queen. wombles president obama and one was george bush. —— one was president obama. all of those love ins with margaret thatcher and ronald reagan, they were official visits. perfectly good visits but not technically state visit with all the formality of state banquets and process it involves. normally this
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is quite a long time. it is over a year these things are planned. a committee looks at it. but the key point to understand it is at the request of the government. the queen hangs on the advice of the government of the day. the government of the day. the government decides whether or not these things happen. it is the prime minister, the government who makes these decisions. obviously people that have come on previous state visits have included robert mcgarvey, nicolae ceausescu among others. —— robert mcgarvey. what about the diplomatic influence and the importance of trade, as well? they are a weapon british diplomacy to promote british interests. not because the queen thinks she would like to meet this trump feller and see what he is like. these things happen for a purpose. the reason the queen saw so
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happen for a purpose. the reason the queen saw so many happen for a purpose. the reason the queen saw so many ghastly tyrants in the 60s and 70s is because at the time they were considered to be cold war allies. the president of indonesia, former president of the democratic republic of congo, they we re democratic republic of congo, they were not particularly nice people, huge internal repression was known about at the time but we were there to support a legend allies. famously in 1971 the emperor of japan to support a legend allies. famously in 1971 the emperor ofjapan was invited and he was the japanese wartime leader. very controversial. the purpose of that was an act of reconciliation to stop the process of bringingjapan reconciliation to stop the process of bringing japan —— start the process of bringing them back into the community of nations in the post—war years. many veterans of the conflict had suffered so much and they wore red gloves representing they wore red gloves representing the blood of comrades. as the procession went down the street they turned their backs. the idea a state visit has nothing to do with politics and isn't controversial is not borne out by facts. thanks,
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james. the prospect of the uk leaving the european union will move a step closer today when mps begin debating the bill that will give theresa may the authority to trigger article 50. the government was forced to draw up the legislation after being over—ruled in the supreme court. some labour mps and the snp have said they'll vote against the measure. despitejeremy despite jeremy corbyn despitejeremy corbyn urging his mps not to vote against it. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminsterfor us. there will be five days of argument in the house of commons. we can expect plenty of arguments with something like 100 or more amendments having been a table. there will be an argument about the pace of the legislation and an argument about the lack so far of a white paper. but the expectation is the end of the process will have mrs
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may getting her bill in her timetable. in other words it will be passed by the end of march. joining me at critics of the prime list‘s brexit approach, including nicky morgan. and chris leslie. the problem is people like you will not vote against the legislation. there is that minor thing of the referendum which is a big thing. it was the democratic outcome. however, what is happening is as the supreme court said, this bill, the article 50 trigger, is now put in front of parliament and there is a need to make a judgment about the prime minister's plan. it is clear she is going down the route of hard brexit andl going down the route of hard brexit and i cannot bring myself to endorse that by voting in favour of the bill. instead i think we have to try and salvage all those aspects of the best things about european alliances, the single market, making sure we have tariff free trade, and
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thatis sure we have tariff free trade, and that is why we have so many amendments because it is a big decision. nicky morgan, this might be your one and only chance to stop brexit. there is no definite chance would get a vote down the line to revisit it so if you are going to oppose you will have to do it now. there are a number of issues. the prime minster said mps will get a vote at the end of the process. this isa vote at the end of the process. this is a process to start negotiation to trigger the notice. i have already said in the house i think it is different and separate from both negotiations we set out in the white paper which we pushed for which the government conceded last week, building on the prime minister's speech. we have negotiations coming and that is not to say mps will not be scrutinising the bill very heavily. and asking for more detail about how parliament will continue to be involved. one key amendment being put down is the idea of a meaningful vote. in other words mrs may has to get the approval of
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parliament before she agrees a deal and not afterwards. do you support that? many of us will be pressing on that. i would like to hear what david davis and the prime minister will say on that. our constituents expect us to talk about this process is not just now expect us to talk about this process is notjust now and in the next six weeks but going forward negotiations. i have e—mails pouring into my inbox from people with views on the negotiations and the approach to brexit. they expect me to speak up to brexit. they expect me to speak upfor to brexit. they expect me to speak up for them to brexit. they expect me to speak upforthem in to brexit. they expect me to speak up for them in the next two years and then to have a say at the end of the process. what do you say, chris leslie, to those who say that the moment is giving mps an opportunity to block the democratic result in the referendum ? to block the democratic result in the referendum? to veto the deal done by mrs may? there was only one question on the ballot paper. do we remain all leave the eu? but it was silent on other massive ramifications of withdrawing. this
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bill is much more important than the maastricht bill, the lisbon treaty, the amsterdam treaty all rolled into one. it is about a potential severance from these massive agreements. we have a responsibility to ask questions. i would like to ta ke to ask questions. i would like to take us away from the hard brexit route. it is an absolute outrage the governed by going to try and curtail the debate in the committee stage when we can do these amendments to just three days. a ridiculously short period of time. thanks very much indeed. we are going to have five days of debate in the house of commons and then it moves to the house of lords. one interesting thing last night, members of the house of lords were told the government hopes to have it through the house of lords by the 7th of march, well before mrs may's end of march, well before mrs may's end of march deadline, which maybe underlines a sense of confidence in government circles they can get this through and possibly get it through quickly. studio: norman, thank you.
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let's look at some of today's other developing stories. a french—canadian student has appeared in court in quebec, charged with the murder of six muslim worshippers who were shot dead at a mosque on sunday. alexandre bissonnette, who's 27, did not speak during his court appearance. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. vigils have been held across canada in memory of those killed. borrowing slowed for the first time in five months according to figures from the bank of england. some economists say it might be a sign households might be reining in spending as last year's brexit boat pushed up inflation. last year british consumers recorded the fastest growth in spending among the world's richest economies. a think tank claims the government plans for creating more apprenticeships in england might turn out to be a waste
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of public money. the institute for fiscal studies warns the new apprenticeship drive won't provide highly paid staff and is just an exercise in hitting targets. the education department said it will enable millions of people to receive high—quality training. a report by mps has described housing conditions for asylum seekers in the uk as "disgraceful". the home affairs committee says people have been living in dirty accommodation infested with vermin. the home office has said it worked closely with the companies responsible to ensure accommodation was "safe, habitable, and adequately equipped." a network of wildlife traffickers, selling baby chimpanzees as pets, has been exposed by a year—long bbc news investigation. the research uncovered a notorious west african hub for wildlife trafficking, and led to the rescue of a one—year—old chimp. the animals are seized from the wild and sold through corrupt officials and middlemen for about £10,000 each. scientists say they may have found the oldest human ancestor — a microscopic sea creature,
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with a bag—like body and a big mouth. they've been studying fossilised traces of the 540—million year old creature, in china. the sea animal is the earliest known step on the evolutionary path that led to fish and eventually to humans. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all the day's top stories. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: president trump has sacked the acting us attorney general, accusing her of betrayal after she refused to enforce his travel ban a former senior civil servant has said a state visit by president trump this year puts the queen in a difficult position. mps will today debate the government's bill to trigger the formal process of leaving the european union. sutton united, the lowest ranked
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side in the fa cup have a glamorous tie with the 12 time winners arsenal in the fifth round. they are one of two non—league teams remaining in the draw. transfer deadline day is today. premier league spending is expected to reach record levels. £150 million has already been spent and activity today is expected to ta ke and activity today is expected to take it passed £225 million. seven matches in the premier league this evening. the biggest sees the league leaders chelsea up against liverpool at anfield. a defeat for liverpool would mean a fourth defeat in a row against them. i will be back with more at around half past. loneliness has been called ‘the hidden epidemic‘ and a commission to find practical solutions is being launched today in parliament by two mps. it‘s in memory of their late colleaguejo cox, who‘d been passionate about tackling the problem. tim muffett has been talking tojo‘s
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sister, kim leadbeater. it isa it is a horrible problem. you sort of go down and down and down with a loss of confidence. sandra's loneliness was all—consuming. loss of confidence. sandra's loneliness was all—consumingm leads to other things. it affects your mental health and things like that. it makes you depressed. how bats did things get for you? really bad. really bad where i did not want to live any more. made aware of her isolation sandra was visited by her mp,jo cox. isolation sandra was visited by her mp, jo cox. i wanted to speak to her and talk about the elderly being lonely, isolated, ill, nobody going to their homes. she was really shocked, i thought. to their homes. she was really shocked, ithought. she to their homes. she was really shocked, i thought. she was really listening, you know, intense. i think she looked a bit upset as well. jo cox began setting up a
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cross— party well. jo cox began setting up a cross—party commission on loneliness to help tackle the issue when she was murdered. it was one of those issues... with the backing of her family today it is officially launched. we have had very dark days and very dark times as you would expect. but actually we are not going to be beaten by what happened. and for me, i have decided i am going to come out fighting and i am going to come out fighting and i am going to come out fighting and i am going to try and make some of the changes and differences joe going to try and make some of the changes and differencesjoe cannot make for herself any more. the idea is politicians, charities and other organisations work together to help those who feel isolated. we were like that from being kids. the people we cared about, i cannot be back to normality because there is i'io back to normality because there is no normality without her but what i can do is try and work to continue some of the good stuff she did and try and make her proud. more than 9 million people, around a fifth of the uk adult population, often feel
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lonely according to one study. the impact on health can be profound. but the missing loneliness is a problem can be difficult. —— admitting loneliness. sandra contacted the voluntary service, one of 13 organisations supporting the jo cox loneliness commission. volu nteers jo cox loneliness commission. volunteers like victoria take time out to visit lonely people. the impact can be profound. it is quite simple at the end of the day. i spend one hour in the whole week, i stop in on my way home from work. it is no extra effort on my part but the benefit people get out of it will be massive in terms of what you can do. really, really nice people. sta rt can do. really, really nice people. start a conversation. the motto of the new loneliness commission is simple. it is hoped it will be effective. and labour‘s rachel reeves, a close
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friend ofjo cox and co—chair of thejo cox commission on loneliness which she has jointly launched with conservative mp seema kennedyjoins me now. thank you forjoining us. sandra reached out to jo cox thank you forjoining us. sandra reached out tojo cox and told her how she was feeling. she responded ina very how she was feeling. she responded in a very human way to that and that has led to this. a lot of people out there who are lonely do not know how to reach out and don‘t feel they can. they do not have the confidence, whatever it is. and you get to them? this commission is about encouraging people to start talking about how they are feeling and whether they are experiencing loneliness. it is also a call to action. all of us know in our own lives we can do a bit more and perhaps live our lives likejo cox did, making time of others, putting other people first and really listening. what we want to come from this commission is four more people
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to do those little things in their life, like the volunteer you spoke to, reaching out to people like sandra and the millions of them living alongside us, members of our family, friends and people in our community and start a conversation with people who we think might be at risk of being lonely. is that just getting people to think and take the time and have the empathy to do things themselves, or is there a way that it can actually be manufactured ina more that it can actually be manufactured in a more organised type of way? we are working with 13 organisations, including many charities on the commission. many of them have voluntarily worked like the people you spoke to. if you have got the time to give one hour a week perhaps to volunteer in your local community and makea to volunteer in your local community and make a difference to those who live nearby, that would be fantastic. but there are also small
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things we can do. picking up the phone to an elderly relative, knocking on the door neighbour who we know was on their own. small things like that are very easy to do but actually can make a big difference. towards the end of the year we will publish a manifesto based on our research and case studies and meetings in the course of the year, calling on governments to ta ke of the year, calling on governments to take action, as well. i hope collectively this year we can start a conversation about loneliness and begin tackling it in our communities. what would you say to somebody watching thinking it is tugging at their heartstrings but i am busy, iwork, i have kids, everybody has a lot going on in their life and maybe they do not have the time. if you have five minutes you can pick up the phone to maybe an elderly relative who you had meant to call but did not get round to it. if you have half an hour you can knock on the door neighbour who you know is on their own. ask if they want a cup of tea 01’ own. ask if they want a cup of tea or to pop round to your house. if
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you have got a bit longer you can go and volunteer for one of the fantastic community organisations which we all have in our neighbourhood. everybody can do something. it can start with something. it can start with something very small. yet those small things, showing people we care about them and making time for others can make a big difference. whatjo cox saw in her constituency andi whatjo cox saw in her constituency and i see in my own is some people can go days at a time and others weeks at a time without meaningful contact with another human being. what makes us all human is that human interaction, that contact with other people. there are small things we can do in our own life to make a difference for some of the else and with 9 million people saying they feel lonely all or most of the time, in truth all of us have somebody close to us or nearby to ask experiencing loneliness. we could help to alleviate that. rachel reeves, thank you. and if you‘re affected by some of these issues we have tips online from 90—year old derek taylor,
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whose ideas to combat loneliness have been published by manchester city council. that‘s at bbc.co.uk/news. peter capaldi has announced his plans to hang up his sonic screwdriver and step down from doctor who. he will leave the tardis for the last time during the christmas special later this year, saying he felt it was time to move on. with me to discuss peter capaldi‘s departure and who may regenerate into the next doctor is scott bryan, tv editor at buzzfeed. thank you for coming in. is it sad? it isa thank you for coming in. is it sad? it is a bit sad but we have still got him in the role for a year yet _- j. got him in the role for a year yet ——j. there is got him in the role for a year yet —— j. there is the series and the christmas special. —— one year left to go. we want to get more people to watch the series but yes, it is a
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little bit sad. how does he compare to the previous doctors? he has taken it in his own way. with each doctor there has been a distinctive personality. i would say he has not been as popular as matt smith. the series has not been as popular in terms of the ratings under david tennant and terms of the ratings under david tenna nt and matt terms of the ratings under david tennant and matt smith. but i would not say it is necessarily down to peter capaldi. there not say it is necessarily down to peter ca paldi. there has not say it is necessarily down to peter capaldi. there has been a lot of speculation about whether the script could be a bit more straightforward. they have been a bit complicated so far. i think he will go down as a firm favourite with doctor who fans. who would you like to see replace him? a lot of people have said they wanted a woman 01’ someone people have said they wanted a woman or someone from people have said they wanted a woman or someone from an people have said they wanted a woman or someone from an ethnic minority. absolutely. there are definitely a lot of people, a lot of names have been bandied about. i think it is quite interesting where in the past they have always gone for quite left—field choices. with peter
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capaldi most left—field choices. with peter ca paldi most people left—field choices. with peter capaldi most people knew him as malcolm tucker with many swear words past nine o‘clock. i would personally love olivia colman. i think she is fantastic in the night manager. she is 14-1. we are having an opinion poll on what people reckon. we are that everybody from danny reckon. we are that everybody from da n ny tyler reckon. we are that everybody from danny tyler to michaela colgan, from misfits, a wide variety of people. anyone could be the next doctor who. there is a large number of people who do still care. you mentioned the viewing figures. how popular is doctor who these days? the problem is you have got overnight ratings and people watching it when it broadcasts and the 30 day consolidated ratings with everybody watching on i play. it becomes a little bit vague. about 5 million people watch it on a saturday night and then 2 million in the next 30 days. that makes 7 million which might sound good, but with david
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tennant five might sound good, but with david tenna nt five years might sound good, but with david tennant five years ago usually got ten or 11 million. but the show is massive abroad with huge appeal. it is one of the biggest shows on bbc america last year. you can pull the figures many different ways in which you would like. i think a new doctor who and a new producer because steven who and a new producer because steve n m offat who and a new producer because steven moffat is leaving, it will allow them to freshen up and go with allow them to freshen up and go with a new approach and wipe the slate clea n a new approach and wipe the slate clean bringing in a new generation of fans. thank you very much, scott brown from buzzfeed. now the weather. thank you. good morning. a dismal morning for many with a lot of cloud around, misty and murky and a lot of rain, as well. very heavy and part of northern ireland. here an improvement in the afternoon as this weather front is moving eastwards, taking heavy rain in too much of scotland. england and wales generally light and patchy with a lot of low cloud and hill fog.
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brightness appearing across northern ireland with 11 degrees for belfast. very mild in the south—west. distinctly cold in the coastal parts of england and scotland. another bit of england and scotland. another bit of rain in england and wales overnight. we could have some heavy bursts with low cloud, missed and murky conditions. in scotland and northern ireland, given some clear skies, quite cold in one or two places with mist and fog. we start with rain in central and eastern areas. pushing into the north sea. then apart from a little bit of cloud, some sunshine into the afternoon. for many of us it is a fine afternoon to come. quite warm in the south and a bit less cold in the north, as well. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... president trump sacks his acting attorney general after she questioned the legality of his controversial travel ban. one of britain‘s most senior former
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civil servants says theresa may has put the queen in a very difficult position by offering him a state visit so early in his presidency. mps prepare to debate the bill which gives the government the authority to start the formal process of leaving the eu. canadian police have charged a french—canadian student over the fatal shooting of six muslim worshippers at a mosque in quebec on sunday. peter ca paldi shocks fans by announcing he‘s stepping down from his role as doctor who. let‘s catch up with the sport now. dreams have come true for non—league sutton united. cheering the lowest ranked side left in the fa cup will host 12—time winners arsenal in the fifth round of the fa cup.
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it means the premier league side‘s superstars will be making the trip to gander green lane. with a capacity ofjust 5,000, it is 55,000 less than the emirates stadium. a tie for the fans and players alike to look forward to next month. arsenal at home, cannot ask for much better. such a buzz around the town at the minute. a few of the lads coming through the arsenal academy, great time for them to play against the team. we are buzzing. still sinking in but it is an unbelievable draw for us. it is what dreams are made of. home against a club like arsenal. they have worked so hard to get to this stage. magnificent draw for this football club. this then is the draw in full. lincoln city will face premier league opponent as well in the shape
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of burnley. there are no all premier league ties. wolves‘ reward for knocking out liverpool on the weekend is a home tie with league leaders chelsea at molineaux. today is transfer deadline day, with premier league spending in this january transfer window expected to reach record levels. spending has already reached £150 million. it‘s expected to surpass the £225 million spent in the january window back in 2011. dimitri payet is one of the biggest deals to have already been completed, moving for £25 million from west ham to marseille. the window closes at 11pm tonight in england, and midnight in scotland. in the finalfew in the final few hours leading up to the transfer window closing there will be seven premier league fixtures. liverpool against chelsea is the pick of those to come. jurgen klopp‘s team go into the game on the back of three straight home defeat and pen point adrift of the league leaders. i can say nothing about
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chelsea‘s petition, we have only one thing to do, to try everything to keep these three points here. no influence, if they lose and win the rest, they are probably the champion so that is not our thing to think about. it is only the game. and that‘s an interesting challenge for ups because they are in a good moment —— for us. it means something but not everything and that‘s football. we lost a few games we should have won and i think a lot of people think in this moment it could be difficult for liverpool and it is difficult, no doubt about it, but possible. and so, who wants to help, you are very welcome. it will be a very tough game, we know this. because liverpool come after three defeats. and we must pay great
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attention because liverpool is a really good team. it is in the six teams that can fight until the end to win the title ought to find a place in champions league. a big match to come tonight. that‘s all sport for now. more now on donald trump sacking the acting attorney general after she questioned the legality of his controversial travel ban. sally yates was the latest critic to speak out against his decision to stop citizens of seven mainly—muslim countries from going to the united states. former president barack obama also made an unprecedented intervention in the immigration row, warning that american values are at stake. in march 2015, during her senate confirmation hearing, sally yates was questioned by senatorjeff sessions, who is president trump‘s nominee for attorney general, on whether she would stand up to the president. you had to watch out because people
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will be asking you to do things and you need to say no about. do you think the attorney general has the responsibility to say no to the president if he asks for something thatis president if he asks for something that is improper? a lot of people have defended the let nomination by saying that he appoint somebody who is going to execute his views. what‘s wrong with that? if the views of the book didn‘t want to execute our unlawful, it should be attorney general or the deputy say no?|j believe general or the deputy say no?” believe the attorney general or deputy attorney general has an obligation to follow the law and the constitution and to give the independent legal advice to the president. that is the woman who has now gone, sally yates. the white house said she had betrayed the department. donald trump has been
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tweeting in the party moments... with me is michael djohns, a former george w bush speechwriter and founding member of the tea party movement. thank you forjoining us. we heard from sally yates previously saying it is all about independent advice toa it is all about independent advice to a president and if an attorney general thinks a president is doing something unlawful, they had to speak up. did she do the right thing? i'm not really sure her statement said that specifically come i thought it was very vague, or that the constitutional objections she might have had toward this. she said she doubted the legality of it. the constitutional issues that apply
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to this case are almost irrelevant because we‘re putting about foreign citizens. and it is the right of any citizens. and it is the right of any citizen or organisation to bring a lawsuit is the american civil liberties union has done here, and it is the responsibility to mitigate that and have caught the site of the decision. it is not the role of a political appointee, which is what the attorney general is, to be arbitrarily not following an order. and that order was contrary to what has largely been reported, there was a lot of legal input into that including from thejustice department and divisions within it. frankly, her replacement is com pletely frankly, her replacement is
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completely warranted and i think from her perspective it would have been better if she had simply resigned. he said the attorney general serves at the pleasure of the president. are you saying that they should always be a yes person? no, ithink they should always be a yes person? no, i think the attorney general has undeniable independent authority and use greater discretion in which cases they do and do not bring as we saw with the tea party movement when the last attorney general failed to bring any charges is related to unlawful targeting of our movement. those are decisions made and a lot of the time it lies within the justice department but ultimately on a presidential order that has been signed and supported by our democratically elected president, after a campaign where we had gone through all these debates for a year and a half, for her to take a different track with a very vague
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response, saying it wasn‘t right... it was very much her own political viewpoint and that is not her role. in terms of the travel ban and the impact potentially on the united states, donald trump said it‘s not about muslims, it‘s about making americans safer also obviously a lot of people are speaking out and saying that they are concerned it is not making americans safer. do you believe this will make americans safer or do you have any fears that it could be counter—productive and are recruiting possibility? it's going to be very productive. and it‘s not a muslim ban, there are 57 predominantly muslim countries in the world and this effect seven of them and only for a short period of time while the administration assesses how it can get its arms around ensuring people who come into this country are not affiliated with
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malevolent intentions. it is the priority of the president to ensure this does not occur. that administration of the last eight yea rs administration of the last eight years was very remiss and dutiful as it related to that obligation. our immigration programmes here are not only mismanaged but unmanaged so i believe it is a constructive step, particularly when our intelligence services have testified under oath that isis is engaged in trying to infiltrate predominantly the syrian immigration programme, it is important to make sure that is not allowed and it is deterred. this is allowed and it is deterred. this is a sensible and very legal way, contrary to what the attorney general said, for us to do that. thank you. also i‘m joined by ryan costello, a policy fellow at the national iranian american council. what is your perspective on that?
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obviously the president‘s view and that many others is that this is about security. certainly there are security concerns and you will have to take a tough look at people coming in but the people who are affected by this executive order have already been vetted for months. you are talking about people who have gone through the vetting process for visas, about legal permanent residents who have lived here for years and years and who are now concerned they will not be able to get back into the country to get back to the families and loved ones. security concerns aside, this is a profoundly un—american order. it is astounding that it anybody who can be defending it. there are reports, polls measuring what the popular american view is on this. it is something that the president
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campaigned on when he was standing for the presidency and one poll indicates that 56% of american voters were in favour of the temporary block on visas relating to those countries from entering the us until the government proves it ability to screen for likely terrorists. other polls indicate similar levels of support.” terrorists. other polls indicate similar levels of support. i think this is down to the fact that there are valid security concerns but when you look at the fact that this would not have stopped the 911 attacks, the san bernardino attacks, the pulse nightclub attacks, these countries were rather arbitrarily chosen to go through these are processed instead of the visa waiver processed instead of the visa waiver process and that is how they determined which countries would fall under this ban. it is incredibly arbitrary. i talked to some of whom applied for a harvard
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post—doc, got that fellowship and was going to become to the united states, not only quit herjob but convinced her boyfriend to quit his job to move to the united states only to be turned back at the airport at frankfurt. i don't see how that makes any sense or enhances out how that makes any sense or enhances our security. it is not the first time restrictions had been made on movement of refugees by residents. president card introduced a ban on iranians after the hostage crisis in 1980, franklin d roosevelt nix limited the number of germanjewish allergies in world war ii because of fears that nazis could try to use that programme to get into the us. and it is only temporary. on the temporary question, iranians in particular are very concerned that this could be made permanent. after
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30 days the secondary opponent itoje will submit a list of countries that are not providing sufficient information to the united states on these travellers. the president will then put in an order to make it an indefinite ban if they do not comply. when it comes to iran, which has no permanent relations, no formal relations with the united states, people pursuing these go outside the country to for one. iran has already said it is not going to comply with providing additional information to the united states. this is going to be a permanent ban more likely than not. people also have not recognised this element of the order. thank you. a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children
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out of school for term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. fivejudges will hear five judges will hear an appeal by an isle of wight council which find an isle of wight council which find a father for taking his daughter to florida without permission from her school. he challenged the fine in the high court and won. we will have more on that in a moment. and also a summary more on that in a moment. and also a summary of the business news but let‘s just update you with the headlines first. president trump has sacked the acting us attorney general, sally yates, accusing her of betrayal after she refused to enforce his travel ban. a former senior civil servant says a state visit by president trump this year puts the queen in a difficult position. mps will today debate the government‘s bill to trigger the formal process of leaving the european union. in the business news this morning... the uk‘s cities are reporting record
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levels of construction with building booming in birmingham, and record levels of office, residential and retail construction in manchester, leeds and belfast. construction can give a real indication of how confident the economy is. we‘ll be finding out more in a moment. deutsche bank has been fined £504 million by us and uk regulators in connection with a russian money laundering plan. under the scheme, clients illegally moved $10 billion out of russia via shares bought and sold through the bank‘s moscow, london and new york offices. authorities said deutsche had missed "numerous opportunities" to detect, investigate and stop the scheme. royal dutch shell has agreed to sell almost £2.5 billion worth of north sea assets to oil exploration firm chrysaor as part of continuing efforts to reduce their debt. shell wants to sell £24 billion of assets by 2018 to help pay off debt following its takeover of bg group. this deal represents about half of shell‘s 2016 north sea output. have you heard of the crane survey?
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run by deloitte, the survey monitors construction activity, and this year it‘s noticed a significant increase in construction and cranes in the uk‘s regional cities. simon bedford is a partner at deloitte real estate. simon, the kind of construction we are looking at it every type, residential, student accommodation, hotels, offices, shops, everything so hotels, offices, shops, everything so what is driving it?” hotels, offices, shops, everything so what is driving it? i think the regional tadese are having a good time at the moment. we are seeing more investment from overseas —— at the regional cities. and people are looking for value outside london which is driving investment and it is the good news story. you talk about the investment from overseas, with the brexit vote that could be concerned about continuing growth. you said earlier that the weaker
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sterling as a consequence of the brexit vote has increased foreign investment in these construction projects. we already looking at significant interest from overseas markets but certainly the devaluation we have seen has given investors more confidence they can create value in the uk and in particular the manchester, leeds, birmingham and belfast market and thatis birmingham and belfast market and that is beginning to come through. if you are talking about record levels of growth. can it be sustained? we think so. we are seeing significant amount of new residential development, particularly in manchester and birmingham, more students and graduates moving to those cities and the others we mentioned. and a real creation of new jobs the others we mentioned. and a real creation of newjobs for younger people. we think it is sustainable and we can see it happening over the next two or three years. looking at construction, seeing more crying on the skyline can be an indication of confidence in the economy —— more
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cranes. but construction it‘s only a small sector of the wider uk economy so small sector of the wider uk economy so what does it tell us about that? as you say, construction is only a small proportion of the economy. one thing to look at is the amount of jobs being created. leeds has had a record number of private sectorjobs created in the city this year, birmingham is attracting significant investment from the likes of hsbc and other corporates and manchester does very well indeed creative and life sciences sectors. it is not a bad cranes per se but aboutjobs and investment which bring forward more office uses and you then need to build more houses to support people —— about cranes. build more houses to support people -- about cranes. the different cities have different story to tell. in manchester there is a real residential boom with 25 story residential boom with 25 story residential power blocs, the youngest —— largest in the uk, but in belfast is all about student accommodation. belfast isjust
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welcomed the university titbit city centre and we see that as a big change for them. —— ulster university to the city centre. that is fuelling demand for student residential accommodation. belfast isa residential accommodation. belfast is a good story about strengthening its city centre, particularly for the student offer. simon bedford, thank you for your time. in other business news, bookmakers are furious about what they have called a flawed report on gambling by mps. the bookmakers‘ trade body has reacted angrily to the report on fixed—odd betting terminals. mps have recommended that the maximum stake for gambling on the electronic terminals in a bookmakers shop is cut to just £2. currently the maximum stake is £100 and they account for more than 50% of bookmakers‘ profits. nintendo has reported better—than—expected profits thanks partly to the success of its games for mobile phones. the japanese gaming giant saw profits of £456 million,
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in the three months to december. it will launch its newest console, called switch, in early march. online grocer ocado has delivered a significant rise in annual profits. they reported a 21.8% increase in pre—tax profits to £14.5 million for the year to the end of november. however, the average order size fell 2.7% to £108.10 against the backdrop of continuing supermarket price wars and a long—awaited overseas deal has not yet materialised. let‘s look at the markets. the dax and the cac, because we have had an estimate on euro area annual inflation expected to be 1.8% injanuary 2017, up from 1.1% in december 2016, according to eurostat, the eu‘s stats office. it‘s important because it takes the rate of inflation closer to the european central bank‘s target of 2% and may lead to the bank cutting back on its stimulus programme. it also looks at core inflation
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which strips out those rises in energy and processed food prices and that rate remained unchanged at no .9%. that‘s all the business news. now, as any parent knows, meal times can be difficult. but new research suggests you can actually train children to enjoy certain foods if they have enough of it. it‘s all part of the bbc‘s terrific scientific project, aimed at getting more youngsters involved in science. jayne mccubbin has been to a school in cardiff to find out more. this is kale. kale is a vegetable which is packed full of polyphenols which are chemicals that are really, really good for us. but as a result, it tastes quite bitter. this is what they think of it at st fagan‘s primary in cardiff. eurgh! tastes like burnt rubber. this is actually day one of a three—week citizen science experiment to find out why some children find it so hard to like certain foods... i feel sick. ..and if they can be trained to acquire a taste.
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a month later, we are back. every day for the past three weeks, one group has eaten raisins. another, kale. what we found was that the children who had kale every day were much more likely to like it than the children who had raisins every day. it shows us that, actually, we just need to keep trying these things and gradually, we can learn to like them. so, children like jack have gone from this... to this. from a two out of ten to eight out of ten. that‘s pretty good, isn‘t it? from a three to seven? brilliant. it's really nice. really? from a zero to a nine. but it didn‘t work for everyone. this is still unpleasant? is it better? no. why might this be? well, the next part of the experiment tried to find a reason.
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with a bit of food dye and a magnifying glass, they went in search of... super tasters. super tasters have more fungiform papillae on the tongues, the bumps which hold our taste buds. and the children who had the most tended to struggle the most. that‘s really interesting. so, fussy kids, fussy eaters, they might not be being awkward, there might be a very good reason for it. yes, they have a very different sensory world that they are living in. they are tasting things more intensely. which might help explain this girl‘s intense dislike. you had the second—highest number of bumps on your tongue, didn‘t you? yeah. maybe this is the reason why you still don‘t like kale. ifeel like throwing up now. children in england, wales, scotland and ireland all took part in this experiment, part of the bbc‘s terrific scientific programme. and what we‘ve learned is this —
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you really do have to try, try and try again when it comes to new tastes. can i spit it out? they have my sympathy! the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with a look at the weather. thank you very much. it is a pretty dismal day out there with about a front slowly crossing the country bringing a lot of low cloud and hill fog and some rain, some quite heavy. and other areas it is mainly light and patchy. —— southern areas. further east it is dry and cooler with a few gaps in the cloud but sunshine will be a premium today and there will be a lot of cloud around. the best of the sunshine in northern ireland as the weather front clears after a very wet morning with a lot
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of standing water around. the heaviest rain is over scotland at the moment with some wintering is over the high ground but as temperatures rise it looks like it will turn back to rain. a lovely afternoon for northern ireland, ten or 11 degrees in belfast but for england and wales, quite drab with patchy rain and quite chilly on the east coast with that keane south—easterly breeze. much milder in the south west and wales despite the cloud and rain. another ripple of rain moving up from the south across wales and england overnight and some could be heavy in southern, central and eastern areas with low cloud and missed continuing. quite mild as well but in scotland and northern ireland, a dry at night with holes in the cloud so temperatures close to freezing in one or two places with the mist and fog developing. when they starts on a cloudy and damp note for a good proportion of the country but the rain clears away. a bit of cloud hanging back behind it but then the
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sun will come out and a pretty good—looking afternoon for many. where it is mild in the south it will feel quite pleasant. more rain waiting in the wings because this low pressure will bring a wild day on thursday with tightly packed isobars right across the uk so it will be windy, gail or potentially severe gale force the further west you are. but double—figure temperatures pretty much across the uk. we lose that area of low pressure only to be replaced by another and this could be quite vigorous in the south—west on friday with some potentially severe gales in south—west england and wales and northern ireland. it is a bit of a long way off so a bit certain so keep tuned into the weather forecast because there could be some changes. either way, a windy day, mild again in the south and quite cool in the north. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday: president trump fires the acting us attorney general after she refuses
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to enforce his immigration ban. a former head of the foreign office says theresa may has put the queen in a ‘very difficult‘ position by offering president trump a state visit so soon. he since a date has not been set for the state visit it could perhaps be put off a little bit until things have calmed down. in the next half hour, mps begin debating the government‘s bill to trigger the formal process of leaving the european union. emails seen by the bbc reveal lord coe was ‘aware‘ of allegations of russian doping, months before they became public. also in the next hour: — it‘s time to leave daleks, time lords and the tardis behind. it's it‘s time to get back. it's time to get back. back where? to the future. 2017 needs us.
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peter capaldi shocks fans by announcing he‘s leaving his role as doctor who. and wearing slippers in school — new research finds it helps pupils behave better and work harder. good afternoon. it‘s tuesday january the 31st. welcome to bbc newsroom live. donald trump has sacked the united states‘ top legal advisor after she questioned the legality of his immigration measures. sally yates, who was acting attorney general, appointed by barack obama, said she couldn‘t defend president trump‘s decision to temporarily stop refugees and citizens of seven mainly muslim countries from entering america. but the white house said she had "betrayed" the department ofjustice. she‘s been temporarily replaced by dana boente, us attorney for the eastern district of virginia, who has
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directed the department to enforce mr trump‘s order. mr trump is currently awaiting approval by the senate of his nomination for attorney general, republican senatorjeff sessions. in the last half an hour, the president has tweeted: "when will the democrats give us our attorney general and rest of the cabinet?! they should be ashamed of themselves! no wonder dc doesn‘t work!" here, a former head of the foreign office has citicised theresa may‘s state invitation to the new president. in a letter to the times, lord ricketts said the offer had been "premature" and put the queen in a "very difficult situation". protests were held in cities across the uk last night, including cardiff seen here. an online petition calling for the state visit to be cancelled has gathered more than 1.6 million signatures. here‘s our washington correspondent david willis. donald trump‘s controversial travel ban is facing resistance on a variety of fronts. after a weekend of mass protests, chaos at airports and a diplomatic outcry came an unusual act
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of defiance on the part of america‘s top law officer. sally yates, appointed us attorney general by barack obama, said in a letter to lawyers at the justice department that given her responsibility to ensure that the government stands for what is right... deeming that an act of betrayal, mr trump promptly sacked her, installing dana boente as the new attorney general. pending the swearing in of mr trump‘s preferred candidate, alabama senator jeff sessions, whose confirmation has been delayed by democrats in congress. sally yates is not alone in her misgivings, though. barack obama said in a statement that he fundamentally disagreed with the notion of discriminating against individuals on the basis of faith or religion.
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us diplomats have also registered their concerns, leading to this tongue lashing from the white house. if these career bureaucrats have a problem with it, i think that they should either get with the programme, or they can go. later today, mr trump is due to announce his pick for a place on the us supreme court. the choice, he said, was one that would appeal to evangelical christians. he may also be hoping it leads to some better headlines. here, the former head of the foreign office, lord ricketts said theresa may‘s decision to invite donald trump on a state visit to the uk so quickly has put the queen in a "very difficult position". a state visit is the highest accolade the country can pay to a foreign leader. and normally it is offered after a us president has been in office for several years. and to issue the invitation in the first days of president trump‘s being in the white house,
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to happen in the next few months, felt to me when i heard it a bit premature, frankly. i didn‘t think it was necessary. i think it would‘ve been fine to have suggested he come on an official visit for talks with the prime minister, perhaps tea with the queen and save this absolute honour of the state visit for later. my suggestion, and it is only a suggestion, is perhaps since a date has not yet been set for the state visit that it could be put off a little bit perhaps until things calm down and we can receive the president on a state visit in the way we would want to with the celebration of the relationship with the us and in the meantime he should come on early official visit to discuss all the vital things we need to be talking about like a new free trade agreement, for example. but put a state visit off till a bit later. i wouldn‘t suggest we withdraw the invitation but since a date has not been fixed i think we can look again at the timing. let‘s look at some of today‘s other developing stories.
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a french—canadian student has appeared in court in quebec, charged with the murder of six muslim worshippers who were shot dead at a mosque on sunday. alexandre bissonnette, who‘s 27, did not speak during his court appearance. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. vigils have been held across canada in memory of those killed. borrowing slowed for the first time in five months according to figures from the bank of england. some economists say it might be a sign households might be reining in spending as last year‘s brexit vote pushed up inflation. last year british consumers recorded the fastest growth in spending among the world‘s richest economies. a think tank claims the government plans for creating more apprenticeships in england might turn out to be a waste of public money. the institute for fiscal studies warns the new apprenticeship drive won‘t provide highly paid staff and is just an exercise in hitting targets. the education department said it
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will enable millions of people to receive high—quality training. a report by mps has described housing conditions for asylum seekers in the uk as "disgraceful". the home affairs committee says people have been living in dirty accommodation infested with vermin. the home office has said it worked closely with the companies responsible to ensure accommodation was "safe, habitable, and adequately equipped." scientists say they may have found the oldest human ancestor — a microscopic sea creature, with a bag—like body and a big mouth. they‘ve been studying fossilised traces of the 540—million year old creature, in china. the sea animal is the earliest known step on the evolutionary path that led to fish and eventually to humans. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you‘ll be able to get more details on all the day‘s top stories. the prospect of the uk leaving
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the european union will move a step closer today when mps begin debating the bill that will give theresa may the authority to trigger article 50. the government was forced to draw up the legislation after being overruled in the supreme court. some labour mps and the snp have said they‘ll vote against the measure. despitejeremy corbyn urging his mps not to vote against it. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminsterfor us. thanks very much. for such a big vote the first set piece parliamentary battle over brexit, you do not send panic and alarm in the government ranks. members of the house of lords were told they hope to have the meshes through the house of lords by the 7th of march which is quite a bit before mrs may‘s self—imposed deadline of the end of march. is she right to be confident?
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i‘m joined by the labour chairman of the brexit select committee, hilary benn. does she have grounds for confidence? i think the house of commons and the house of lords will, whatever view people took in the referendum, and it is difficult for people who campaigned hard for remain will accept we have had a referendum and the british people by 5296 referendum and the british people by 52% compared to 48 have made the decision and we have to respect the outcome. and the way you have two respect it is by voting for this bill. that is why i expect it to go through. yet a host of amendments have been put down. what do you identify as the key amendment?” think what they show clearly is there is a strong appetite in the house of commons, having said to the government, 0k, it is going through, thatis government, 0k, it is going through, that is not a blank cheque henceforth. because what's the referendum decided was the fact we
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are leaving. it did not decide the terms of the bases of our new relationship with european partners. so on things like access to the single market, membership of the customs union, cooperating on foreign policy, and the crucial question of the vote at the end of negotiations, it is important it is insufficient time for parliament to scrutinise the deal and to say either, that looks fine, or it is mostly fine but that bit isn't, go back and try and get something better. i think the lesson is parliament is determined to participate in this process and not bea participate in this process and not be a bystander to a government negotiation. is it your last chance to force the government‘s hand? you might not get another opportunity down the line to make sure mps get that vote which you say is necessary before the deal. the government has said there will be a vote and therefore i think it is important it
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is insufficient time. it is up to the house of commons to decide how to vote on that particular amendment. i to vote on that particular amendment. lam to vote on that particular amendment. i am in favour of a meaningful vote and it has to be insufficient time. as you were saying earlier there will then be the great repeal bill, and there may be more opportunities to have something to say as far as the process is concerned when that appears before the house of commons in the early summer. where does labour emerge from this? it appears profoundly divided with mps threatening to resign from the front bench and others abstaining and others going to vote against, some supporting jeremy corbyn. it is a com plete supporting jeremy corbyn. it is a complete dog ‘s dinner. supporting jeremy corbyn. it is a complete dog '5 dinner.” supporting jeremy corbyn. it is a complete dog 's dinner. i genuinely do not see it in that way. let's be honest, the country is divided. the country was divided on referendum day and by a narrow majority people voted to leave. and a labour party representing through its mps both of those opinions, i think that is a
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good thing for democracy and i will be voting in support of the bill because it is the right thing to do. you have to respect the outcome of the referendum. we should also acknowledge strongly held views on the part of colleagues and if they represent areas where there was a strong remain that, you can see why some argue as they do that what they wa nt some argue as they do that what they want is to stand by their constituents in those circumstances. the nation has been split. indeed the country has been split on europe for 60 years. it is no surprise it continues and there is nothing wrong with labour representing both opinions. hilary benn, thank you. one update on that white paper the government has promised. we have indications it might be before the detailed scrutiny of the bill ex—week. now sources close to the brexit secretary said that they do not have any kind of timetable. some of mrs may‘s opponents are suggesting that when the white paper
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is published we could have a separate vote down the line on the white paper. potentially another moment when opponents of mrs may‘s plans could try and trip her up. thank you very much, norman. let‘s go back to donald trump who has sacked his attorney general after she questioned the legality of it. a former senior civil servant overhears said the invitation to donald trump for a state visit may be premature and puts the queen in a difficult position. he talks about it potentially downgrading to an official visit and maybe the state visit is pushed back. let‘s speak to the former white house aide, christopher smart, who is now a senior fellow at the foreign policy think tank, chatham house. hejoins me on webcam from massachusetts. donald trump has been tweeting this morning. he asks when will the
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democrats give us our attorney general had the rest of the cabinet? they should be ashamed of themselves. no wonder dc doesn‘t work. it‘s a fair point, isn‘t it? he has picked his team and still does not have a lot of people in position. one example was the attorney general, sally yates, who he has now sacked. sally yates is the deputy attorney general and was appointed by president obama. jeff sessions, his nominee is supposed to be voted out of committee today and will be in place probably this week. ido will be in place probably this week. i do not think the delay is unusual in our particular system. especially when a lot of the forms which should have been filled out were late coming in from have been filled out were late coming infrom many have been filled out were late coming in from many nominees. i do not think that is a big issue right now. and like the president will have his person in thejustice department by the end of the week. -- it is department by the end of the week. —— it is likely. there has been much
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criticism and protest about the travel ban in america and in the uk. and about the state visit which has been talked about as potentially not going ahead. some people want to see it. when you look at the fact that he is doing what he said he would do in his election campaign and polling indicates a majority of people do support this temporary block on visas, what is the reaction in the united states to what he‘s doing and what the reaction has been elsewhere? we are a big country with a lot of people reacting in different ways. we saw a lot of protest a nd different ways. we saw a lot of protest and concern at the weekend in cities across the country and concern within government, with civil servants expressing concern through a descent cable they have sent to the incoming secretary of state. you‘ve seen the reaction from sally yates. on the other hand there are people who voted for him had approved of the fact is doing what he said he‘s going to do. the
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problem is that it is a relatively small number of people who are affected relative to the flow of immigrants and visitors across our borders everyday. the problem is how it was implement it. it sends a very negative signal to foreign partners and allies. it sends a very negative signal to the muslim community worldwide. i think the issue frankly is whether the changes he will introduce to the vetting procedures have any measurable impact on national security. that is very much yet to be determined. what about the signs on the way that he is governing? and the advice that he is taking and who is taking positions? one example is his chief strategist is going to be in all the meetings of the national security council but the director of national intelligence and chairman of the joint chiefs of staff will only
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attend the issues pertaining to their responsibility and expertise are going to be discussed.” their responsibility and expertise are going to be discussed. i think thatis are going to be discussed. i think that is very troubling for many of us. it is not unheard of for a senior political adviser to be part of meetings from time to time. but i think the official change is quite concerning. broadly in terms of how we are learning to interpret the trump administration moves, we have a lwa ys trump administration moves, we have always known donald trump takes his own decisions, and he is a man of action, and in the last week he has acted as he promised he would. the real test will come in terms of the result is able to whether it is on trade, on the economy, or national security. i think the worrying thing about these moves on immigration is they are relatively small, highly symbolic and sent a very negative message and they are unlikely to have a measurable impact on our national security. i just want to
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read a comment coming through from donald tusk from the european union saint donald trump‘s america is among the external threats to the eu along with china, russia and radical islam. —— saying. how do you react to that? that is all we have got at the moment. i do not know. it is a very strong statement from president donald tusk. i think it is a concern many of us have who have looked at global affairs over the years, that the united states has for decades been a source of stability in global affairs and it is now moving in very different directions. if you are looking at things from europe and other parts of the world, it bears close watching on how it evolves. thank you very much indeed, christopher smart, a former white house aide. the headlines on bbc
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newsroom live: president trump has sacked the acting us attorney general, accusing her of betrayal after she refused to enforce his travel ban. a former senior civil servant has said a state visit by president trump this year puts the queen in a difficult position. mps will today debate the government‘s bill to trigger the formal process of leaving the european union. we‘ll catch up with this board with john watson. thank you, good afternoon. claims lord coe misled and mps in quarry are growing after new e—mails confirmed he knew about corruption allegations for months before they became public. the federation president told a select committee that he was not aware of specific allegations of corruption around the russian doping scandal but an around the russian doping scandal butan e—mail around the russian doping scandal but an e—mail from around the russian doping scandal but an e—mailfrom him to the around the russian doping scandal but an e—mail from him to the ethics commission in august 2014 stated, i
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have now been made aware of the allegations. lord coe denies any discrepancy between his evidence and what the e—mails suggest he knew. dreams have come true for the non—league sutton united. dreams have come true for the non-league sutton united. yes! the lowest ranked side in the fa cup will host of the 12 time winners, arsenal, in the fifth round, meaning the premier league side superstars will make the trip to canterbury lane with a capacity of only 5000, 55,000 less than the emirates stadium. in the last few hours leading up to the transfer window closing tonight they will be seven premier league matches. liverpool against chelsea is the pick of the matches. you can club‘s side go in on the back of three home defeat and ten points adrift of the premier league leaders. —— the liverpool manager‘s team. league leaders. —— the liverpool manager's team. we have only one thing to do. we had to try everything to keep these three
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points and again, if they lose here and win the rest, they are probably the champions. that is not our thing to think about. it is only the game. and it is an interesting challenge. really interesting, because they are ina good really interesting, because they are in a good moment. but that means something but not everything. that is football. we have lost a few games we should have won. and a lotta people are thinking at this moment it could be difficult for liverpool and it is difficult, no doubt but it is possible. and so who wa nts to doubt but it is possible. and so who wants to help? you are very welcome. it will be a really tough game. because they have come after three defeats. we must pay great attention. because liverpool is a really good team. these are the six
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teams which can fight until the end to win the title and to fight for their place in the champions league. the thoughts of both managers heading into that match tonight. that is all the sport for now. more at about half past one. studio: john, thank you. austria‘s governing coalition has agreed to ban full—face veils in courts, schools and other public places. the decision was made after a week of negotiations, in a bid to counter the rise of the far—right political movement in the country. bethany is in vienna. what reaction has there been in vienna? it is quite interesting. the number of austrian women wearing the full veil is thought to be less than 200. only about 150 people in all of austria. it has caused some concern. because there are notably a lot of tourists in austria from the gulf. this would
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probably be more likely to affect them than austrians themselves. what perhaps is causing more concern among muslim groups in austria is a more generalised ban against religious symbols being worn in public places in austria. that is still in the planning process. but there is the possibility of the headscarf potentially being banned along with other religious clothing in future. that i think is what is bothering many muslim groups here. certainly this has been seen very much as a way of trying to reduce the rise of the far right in austria, the coalition government is very much under pressure. thank you, bethany. more about brexit. mps will begin debating the bill which gives theresa may the authority to begin the formal process of leaving the european union. let‘s go back to westminster and join norman smith again. thanks. we get blastoff for
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the bill at, where are we now? about five or ten minutes. then we are set for five days a debate in the house of commons and three days of detailed scrutiny before we go to the house of lords, which may be whether real trouble starts for the government. we can consider this with two people on opposite sides of the debate. chuck in a campaign againstan the debate. chuck in a campaign against an peter bowen supported brexit. do you accept the government will get its way and this bill might emerge with absolutely no changes whatsoever? i think a majority in the house of commons can trigger article 50. the government has a mandate to withdraw us from the european union. but the nature of the agreement we reach, they have no mandate on that. theresa may says brexit means brexit. if it does mean something it means £350 million per week will go to the nhs, your view will remember that. —— viewers. borisjohnson, chris grayling and
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others stood next to that red bus promising the british people that if you vote to leave there will be extra money for the nhs. i have put down an amendment requiring the promise to set up plans to put extra money into the nhs as promised by her cabinet ministers. if they renege on that commitment that will be considered a gross betrayal by so many people who voted to leave the european union. peter, do you regard that pledge as a bit of a porky pie? rerunning the referendum campaign is not relevant. hang on, you have had your say. let me have a say. chatting damn people does not help. article 50 is about the process of coming out of the european union. —— talking down does not help. we are coming out of the european union. all the debate afterwards is how we come out and what happens. this is a very simple thing today. we are
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implementing the wishes of the british people through a referendum that we are going to come out of the european union. it is legitimate for mps to want to shape the terms in how we want to leave. nobody is saying we are not leaving. the argument is on what terms. and it is right for parliament to discuss that in the coming months. this is bad triggering the process and not about the negotiations. the next week is fairly straightforward. we implement in the wish of the british people. we are going to come out of the eu. the format, of course parliament must debate that in the months ahead. what do you say to labour mps who say that it is such an important issue, never mind the referendum, it will cause such hardship for my constituents that i had to oppose? different people will take a different view. it is an emotive issue and different constituencies voted in different ways. that is important for having proper time to consider this. when we voted the
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common spent 30 days discussing it. when we discuss the maastricht treaty we spent more than 20 days discussing that. for the treaty of lisbon, over 11 days. to only get five days to debate this very important issue is insufficient. i will not have this constant accusation that you're trying to see the referendum is being integrated and you talk about the £350 million commitment, you might say that the sake of it, we try to make sure that it is delivered. we're not trying to re—litigate... it is delivered. we're not trying to re-litigate. .. there was a wonderful democratic experiment in this country. millions of people took pa rt country. millions of people took part in the vote and they made that decision. that is why the decision to come out has been made and that is all this bill is about, saying that we are starting the process, telling the european union we are coming out. all the other things you are talking about, the debate and discussion in the months ahead will be for that. when will we vote?
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there will be a vote. there will be a lot of votes in between. what is the point of mps having a vote after mrs may has done the deal? we should have a vote afterwards but obviously we will have continuous votes all the way through. there will be a lot of vote on the great repeal act. there is going to be all kinds... and at any time the opposition wants to table a motion is debatable. the idea we are not going to have debates is laughable. we need a vote. i think it is legitimate for people that are worried that what this government is trying to do is to turn britain into a sweatshop and some grand tax haven form aussie nationals and very wealthy people, it is legitimate to seek to amend the bill to make sure we have a bill working for people that does not destroyjobs and livelihood and is in the interest of everyone. not just the top one is which the tory party is famous for defending.” think i‘m right in saying that you have signed a letter by 70 also
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labour mps about donald trump‘s state visit. there is a difference between whether or not he is allowed in the country and whether he is honoured with a state visit. i think it is utterly unacceptable to be honouring a man who has peddled hate, misogyny, racism, islam phobia ina campaign hate, misogyny, racism, islam phobia in a campaign and now seems to be governing in that way. the idea we should be honouring him in the way we have honoured people like nelson mandela, like the pope, that is outrageous to me. of course we should welcome the elected president of the united states. our closest ally with whom we have a special relationship. honouring? of course we should. we should have the president over here on a state visit. it is in our interests and i think that is exactly the thing to do and the prime minister is quite right to do it. what would you say to3 right to do it. what would you say to 3 million muslim citizens? we are
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honouring a man peddling is phobia? what about the visit of the chinese president? was that wrong? come on. you cannot have it both ways. answer the question. the chinese president has not... if you would let me finish the answer, the chinese president has not looked to ban numerous people from coming to his country on the basis of their religion alone. they are happy to kill them in their country. are you really defending chinese human rights? i am not defending chinese human rights. why are you protesting about it? i can‘t member you being on television... the president of china or the president of the united states, i would have them every time. i would disagree. states, i would have them every time. iwould disagree. donald states, i would have them every time. i would disagree. donald trump as divisive as brexit. we will hear shortly from david davis. we will be back to the commons for
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that debate. but let‘s bring you up—to—date with the news on doctor who because if you are a big fan you might be upset to hear that peter capaldi is stepping down, leaving the cardus for the last in this year‘s christmas special as he revealed it is time to move on. we need to get back. back where? to the future. 2017 needs us. leaving us in need of a new time lord. peter capaldi will hand over the sonic screwdriver at the end of this year‘s series. he shocked fans with last night‘s announcement on live radio. i‘ve always been somebody that did a lot of different things, i‘ve never done onejob for three years. this is the first time i‘ve done this. and i feel it‘s sort of time for me to move on to different challenges. and it means a familiar challenge for the show.
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now in its 54th year, with millions of fans, young and old, around the world. of course, some things never change. a dalek. what's a dalek? never mind, it‘s a dalek. regular regeneration has become the hallmark of a time traveller used to riding his luck. the new doctor who will be number 13. the question, as ever, is, who? let‘s catch up with the weather. it will stay pretty cloudy and wet today but there are some big contrast in the temperatures across the country, turning mild in southern and western areas with temperatures up to 13 degrees but in the east with the wind still coming from the confident it will be a bit
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more of a struggle and coupled with that we have winds gusting over 40 mph so there will be a significant wind—chill in northern and eastern parts this afternoon. outbreaks of rainfor parts this afternoon. outbreaks of rain for most of us but northern ireland will brighten up with some dry weather and some sunshine. overnight, more rain working northwards and eastwards with this becoming slow moving so it will be a wet night in the east. a bit of fog in northern ireland and scotland with a touch of frost in the countryside but otherwise a mild night. on wednesday, slow—moving rain affecting eastern areas but easing away and the skies brighten up easing away and the skies brighten upfora time easing away and the skies brighten up for a time but the next system comes in and that will bring another speu comes in and that will bring another spell of wet weather as we finished the day. a bit milder with temperatures at 12 or 13 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... president trump sacks his acting attorney general, after she questions the legality
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of his controversial travel ban. one of britain‘s most senior former civil servants says theresa may has put the queen in a very difficult position by offering mr trump a state visit so early in his presidency. mps are about to start debating the bill which gives the government authority to start the process of leaving the eu. we‘ll be live in the commons. claims that lord coe misled an mps‘ inquiry grow as emails seen by the bbc reveal he was aware of allegations of russian doping, four months before they became public. peter capaldi is to step down from the lead role in the bbc series doctor who at the end of the year. a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children out of school for term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. the case will have ramifications for families across england, as our education correspondent gillian hargreaves explains.
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isle of wight businessmanjon platt says dozens of parents get in touch with him every day about term—time holiday fines. he decided to fight it all the way and says he has no regrets after taking his daughter to disneyland when she had 90% attendance at school. the legal row is about what going to school regularly means. i believe it meant attending school very frequently or very often but their position is it means every day. that is the most—draconian interpretation of this legislation you could possibly have. councils from the isle of wight to the north of england have different policies. some issue thousands of fines. others almost none. the rules say if a head declares an absence unauthorised the local council can fine each parent £60 per child. that fine can double if it‘s not paid within 21 days.
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ministers say exam results shape children‘s futures and missing even a few days can make a clear difference. many head teachers agree. it's important because young people only get one chance at their education and one week, two weeks out of that can make an enormous difference in the progress they're able to make in any given year and overall in terms of their education. 35 councils have told the bbc they‘ve revised their guidance since mr platt took his case to court. the outcome could have a big impact. the supreme court will make a decision within months. a woman has gone on trial in bristol after a toddler was shot by an air rifle. she is alleged to have told her partner to shoot the child to frighten them. the partner has already admitted to the offence. what is the latest? the defendant
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emma horsman denies gbh by aiding and abetting her partner. she‘s being cross—examined by the prosecution and trying to explain what happened inside that block of flats in the south of bristol in july last year. what we have heard is it was a regular thing for pa rents is it was a regular thing for parents in the block to get into one another‘s flats on a friday afternoon with young children and they would play together and the adults would chat. it has been alleged that on this friday, while this little boy who was two years old, but in a flat with his mum downstairs in the flat ofjordan walters and emma horseman, jordan walters and emma horseman, jordan walters took out an air gun and began to clean it. it is alleged that during this time that harry
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became tearful and was crying and emma horseman, this neighbour, said to her partner, "shoot him with the gun to frightening and shut him up, shoot him at him." neither of them realised there was a pellet in the air rifle but the trigger was pulled and harry ended up with that pellet inside his head and he had to be taken to hospital, leading profusely. we have heard he is still suffering the consequences of the attack now —— bleeding. emma horseman has been giving her account of what happened. she is being asked whether she saw the gun in her partner‘s hand, whether she said the word attributed to her by harry‘s mother. she said she can‘t remember saying those words and she is anne crook —— unsure if she could see that her partner was holding a gun.
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two versions of events and accounts being recounted here and the jury had been told they are expected to go out later today to decide whether she is guilty of gbh by aiding and abetting something —— something that she denies. ukraine and russia have blamed each other for a surge in fighting in eastern ukraine that has cut off power and water to thousands of civilians. eight ukrainian troops have been killed since fighting intensified on sunday — their heaviest losses for more than a month. almost 10,000 people have been killed since fighting began between ukrainian soldiers and rebels seeking independence, in april 2014. the prince of wales has warned the world is in danger of "forgetting the lessons of the past". he made the comments at a fundraiser for the world jewish relief charity, in what‘s been seen as a thinly veiled attack on donald trump‘s immigration ban. the charity also supports young
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agricultural entrepreneurs in rwanda where people, tragically, share with the jewish community the first—hand knowledge of the evils of genocide. and in this way, world jewish relief shows us how vital it is to learn lessons of a horrors of the past. now, when i arrived here this evening, i had the great pleasure of speaking to ben, a wonderful man who i first speaking to ben, a wonderful man who ifirst met speaking to ben, a wonderful man who i first met through mike patronage of the holocaust memorial day trust. he survived the horrors of concentration camp. he is a man of extraordinary grace and strength, as you would expect from someone who captained the british weightlifting tea m captained the british weightlifting team at the olympics in 1956 and in 1960. he and others like him, who
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have enjoyed indescribable persecution, it is to be reminded of the dangers of forgetting the lessons of the past. the work of world jewish relief enables us to rally together to do what we can to support people practically, emotionally and spiritually, particularly at a time when the horrific lessons of the last war seem horrific lessons of the last war seem to be in increasing danger of being forgotten. let‘s ta ke let‘s take a look at the commons because mps are about to start debating the bill which gives theresa may the authority to start the formal process brexit. labour have said they will not seek to block the triggering of article 50 and it is expected to clear this first stage of business relatively
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easily. it goes back to the commons next week which is when opposition parties will try to push through a series of amendments. david davis, the brexit secretary, who will be piloting the bill through the commons, said it was not about whether or not the uk should leave the eu or how it should do so, it is about implementing a decision already made, a point of no return already made, a point of no return already passed. we ask the people of the uk if they wanted to leave the eu and they decided that they did. the process begins today and that is the scene in the commons, pretty packed. the debate has not begun just yet so we will leave the commonsjust the commons just now and go the commonsjust now and go back when it begins. a network of wildlife traffickers, selling baby chimpanzees as pets, has been exposed by a year—long bbc news investigation. the research uncovered a notorious west african hub for wildlife trafficking, and led to the rescue of a one—year—old chimp. the animals are seized from the wild
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and sold through corrupt officials and middlemen for about £10,000 each. our science editor david shukman reports. of all the crimes involving wildlife, the trade in baby chimpanzees is one of the most shocking. we were sent these videos by dealers offering to sell us the tiny animals. they are in big demand as pets. this one is about a year old, a male, captured in thejungle and orphaned, like the others, when poachers killed his family. he was shown to our undercover reporter, who used a hidden camera to film him being held by a dealer called ibrahima traore in ivory coast. the police were waiting nearby and moved in. the dealer and his uncle were arrested and now face charges
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related to wildlife trafficking. the police havejust made all of these arrests. it is pretty edgy, and it is all about this, a baby chimpanzee taken from thejungle. the real tragedy is that to get one infant chimpanzee out of the jungle, all of the adults in its family have to be killed. that is as many as ten slaughtered just to get one chimp here ready for trade. for the police officer in charge, it is vital to stop the traffickers from wiping out the chimpanzees. the police seized dealers‘ mobile phones. they revealed a global network of smugglers. but for the moment, the international police effort
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is focused on other types of wildlife crime, not chimpanzees. without the funding we cannot do anything, but we are trying to become more intelligence—led, looking at what the threats are and what law enforcement needs to address to maintain a level of security. primates, unfortunately, our information holding is not as strong as it could be. the baby chimp was hungry but safe in the zoo at abidjan. his keepers gave him a name. he is doing well. others are not so lucky. and you can see that full report on the bbc website and there‘s also more on the bbc news at ten this evening. loneliness has been called the hidden epidemic and a commission to find practical solutions is being launched today by two mps in memory of their late colleague jo cox, who‘d been passionate about tackling the problem.
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tim muffett has been talking tojo cox‘s sister, kim leadbeater. and the woman who also first raised theissue and the woman who also first raised the issue withjo cox. it is a horrible problem. you sort of go down and down and down with a loss of confidence. sandra‘s loneliness was all—consuming. loneliness leads to other things. it affects your mental health and things like that. it makes you depressed. how bad did things get for you? really bad. really bad where i did not want to live any more. made aware of her isolation sandra was visited by her mp, jo cox. i wanted to speak tojo and talk about the elderly being lonely, isolated, ill, nobody going to their homes. she was really shocked, i thought. she was really listening, you know, intense.
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i think she looked a bit upset as well. jo had begun setting up a cross—party commission on loneliness to help tackle the issue when she was murdered. it was one of those issues... today, with the backing of her family, it is officially launched. we are going straight to the commons because the debate on the bill that will give theresa may the go—ahead to launch formal negotiations for britain to leave the eu is about to begin. it will be piloted through the commons by the brexit secretary, david davis. nusrat ghani.
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second reading, what day? friday 24th of march. the secondary observation of the honourable jedward... the secondary observation of the honourable jedward. .. this is a bit of parliamentary procedure just —— honourable gentleman.”
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-- honourable gentleman. iwill now proceed to read the orders of the day. european union notification of withdrawal bill, second reading.” inform the house that i have selected the amendment in the name of mr angus robertson. in a moment i shall call the secretary of state for exiting the european union to move the second reading of the bill. however, before i do so, i should just inform the house that no fewer than 99 backbenchers are seeking to catch my eye today, that is to say without regard to how many might seek to contribute tomorrow. there will have to be a tough time limit on backbenchers and the severity of that time limit will depend on the level of consideration shown by frontbenchers. there is of course no
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pressure also the secretary of state for exiting the european union commerce for exiting the european union commerce secretary david davis. this is big i beg to move that the bill be read a second time and given your admonishmentjust now bill be read a second time and given your admonishment just now i bill be read a second time and given your admonishmentjust now i will give the house warning that i won‘t ta ke give the house warning that i won‘t take many interventions, some but not my normal two dozen. this bill respond directly to the supreme courtjudgment on the 24th of january and seeks to honour the commitment the government gave to respect the outcome of the referendum held on the 23rd ofjune last year. it is not a bill about whether the uk should leave the eu, or indeed how it should do so. it is simply about parliament empowering the government to implement a decision already made some point of no already passed. we ask the people of the uk if they wanted to leave the european union and they decided they did. at the core of this bill lies are very simple question. do we
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trust the people or not? the democratic mandate is clear, the electorate voted for a government to give them a referendum, parliament voted to hold the referendum, the people voted in that referendum and we are now honouring the result of that referendum. as we said we would. not at the moment. this is the most straightforward of possible bill is necessary to enact the referendum result and respect the supreme court‘s judgment. indeed, the house of commons at already overwhelmingly passed a motion to support the triggering of article 50 by the 31st of march. we will respect the will of the people and implement their decision by the 31st of march. subsection of clause one simply confers on the premise that the power to notify under article 50 of the treaty of the european union the uk‘s intention to withdraw from
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the uk‘s intention to withdraw from the european union. subsection two of clause one is included to make it clear that the power to trigger article 50 baby conferred on the prime minister regardless of any restrictions on other legislation —— may be conferred. together these clear and succinct powers will allow the buy minister to begin the process of withdrawal from the european union, respecting the decision of the supreme court —— with the prime minister. this is just the beginning of the process to ensure the decision made by the people last june ensure the decision made by the people lastjune is honoured. i will give way briefly. given that is the result of the referendum, triggering article 50 is an inevitable consequence of it, would he agree that whilst it might be honourable for those people who voted against having a referendum in the first place to vote against triggering article 50, that would be consistent, it would be entirely u na cce pta ble consistent, it would be entirely unacceptable for those mps who voted to put this matter to a referendum
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could try to renege on the result of it. my honourable friend makes his point in his own inimitable way. as he knows, i always take the view that people‘s votes in this house area that people‘s votes in this house are a matterfor that people‘s votes in this house are a matter for the own honour and beliefs. i will make some progress. i would like to draw honourable members attention to the explanatory notes which set out the application of the bill. the bill also gives the buy minister —— and a prime minister the power to stop the process to leave. the bill also makes clear that in invoking article 50, we will also be leaving the agency to ensure cooperation on nuclear matters as well as the union. this is because
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although euratom was established at the same time, it uses the same institutions as the eu including the court of justice which institutions as the eu including the court ofjustice which is why the two d oze n court ofjustice which is why the two dozen eight eu amendment act makes clear that in uk law, membership of the eu includes euratom and that is wide article 50 applies to both the eu and euratom -- 2008. i received an e-mail yesterday from a professor who is the head of physics at oxford university who had the dubious pleasure of being my tutor in the mid—905 and he is concerned about the invocations of his fusion research programme if we leave euratom. is there any way we could postpone leaving it by a year or two and if it that is not possible, what assurance could the secretary of state give to the professor and his colleagues? the first thing i would
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say to the honourable gentleman is there it a two—year timetable anyway so we are there it a two—year timetable anyway so we are already two years out from that. the prime minister has already said very clearly in her industrial strategy and in her speech on brexit that we intend to support the scientific community and build as much support for it as we can and we will negotiate when we engage in negotiations after march with the european union with the aim of creating a mechanism to allow research to go on. i will give way. i know the secretary of state is the most attentive minister but can i appeal to him at the start not to keep turning around and looking at people behind him, it is incredibly frustrating for the house. i know the natural temptation. i'm sure that was a valid point but it suffered from the disadvantage that i could not hear it. the consequence
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of this bill go much further than the secretary of state italy is. the government find it self in a position of such a basement to president trump because they have decided to abandon the high ground of the single market place without so of the single market place without so much as a negotiating word being spoken. that is why they are desperate to do a deal with anybody on any terms at any time. why did the secretary lead this country into a position of such weakness?m the secretary lead this country into a position of such weakness? it is all that exactly the opposite. since he picked up on euratom, let me make the point in more elaborate detail. euratom passes through to its constituent countries the regulations, rules and supervision that it inherits from the international atomic energy authority, of which we are still a
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member. when we come to negotiate with the eu over this matter, if it is not possible to come to a conclusion with some sort of relationship with euratom, we will no doubt be able to do one with the international atomic energy authority, possibly the most respectable international body in the world. i‘m afraid he‘s wrong on that. our aims the world. i‘m afraid he‘s wrong on that. ouraims are the world. i‘m afraid he‘s wrong on that. our aims are clear. we will maintain the closest possible nuclear cooperation with the eu and that relationship will take a number of different forms and will be subject to negotiation which will start after we have notified. brexit affords huge opportunities for international trade for global britain. part of that global trade is with the single european market.
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whilst there may be access to the full market, a hybrid access, could be secretary of state confirm that anything that introduces new taxes, tariffs or duties on british goods is not in our national economic interests? the answer to that is yes. i will give way. interests? the answer to that is yes. iwill give way. ithank interests? the answer to that is yes. i will give way. i thank him for giving way. can i urge him and the government to keep an open mind on euratom? there is a danger that there will be years of uncertainty which could put at risk the 21,000 newjobs which are slated to come as pa rt of newjobs which are slated to come as part of the moorside development as well as many others across the uk. he made his point very well... studio: we are leaving that debate but coverage continues on bbc parliament if you would like to continue to carry on watching and you can access that via the bbc news website. the one o‘clock news is coming up next. president trump sacks his attorney general after she refused to implement his controversial travel ban.
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donald trump‘s team have defended the move saying he had to send a message to the civil service that it was not their place to challenge him. after last night‘s protests, more than 70 mps call for donald trump to be banned from addressing parliament if his state visit to britain goes ahead. downing street says the state visit is months away and no timings have been worked out yet. also this lunchtime... the road to brexit. mps begin debating a bill to trigger britain‘s exit from the eu before tomorrow‘s vote. should parents be allowed to take their children on holiday during term time? a legal battle is underway at the supreme court. silent epidemic as millions say they feel lonely but wouldn‘t admit it. a campaign‘s launched to tackle it in the name of murdered mpjo cox. hundreds of baby chimps stolen from the wild in africa and sold as pets. how the authorities are trying to clamp down on the illegal trade.
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